Pattern assembly

MySizePatterns patterns are not only prepared with a great care, but also made as user-friendly as possible. We want all stages of your sewing experience to go smoothly, including the assembly of pattern pieces. See how easily and quickly it can be done thanks to a temporary pinning and no-trimming method.

Our patterns have a unique feature of pattern lines continuing outside the printing/assembly range defined by the right and bottom margins. They are also PDF printed (either in A4 or US letter format) with no margins along the left side and the upper edge of the paper. Thanks to that you can assembly the pattern pages in a very quickly and a hassle-free way. You can join pages without getting rid of the margins (saves a lot of time) and you can also use less glue or sticky tape (saves both the time and your resources). You simply overlap the pages along the printed margin lines (!).

Watch a short video presenting the principle of a temporary pinning and overlapping the pattern pages along the assembly margins (done by a friend who has no experience in sewing or pattern assembly – just to check the simplicity of this idea) … then read the rest of the article carefully.

So lay all the pages down on a flat surface according to their row/column indications. You should be able to recognize the shape of a pattern piece. Check if you have enough working space. We recommend assembling the pages on a table covered with a thick blanket or on a carpeted floor  – this makes pinning the pages together much easier.

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Have a closer look at the markings of the printing area – you will find dotted lines (indicating margins) along the two edges of the page. They are guidelines for assembling the parts of a pattern piece. They tell you where you need to overlap the pages. You will also see that a fraction of a pattern is not printed by you printer. It is normal that physical printers leave some 3mm/3/8″ from the paper edge blank – they are simply not able to print the 100% of the page. This is absolutely no problem. You will see it in further steps.

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Start the assembly process by stabilizing the first page with 2 pins (or placing something not too heavy on its surface). Align the left edge of the page lying next to it with the right margin line printed on the first page. Repeat the same step with the next two pages.

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Once the (temporary assembly of the) first row is done and the pages are aligned along their right vertical margins, we can proceed with adding the second row. Align the first page of the second row along the bottom margin of the very first page (Grid 1,1). Use only pins to stabilize this construction, use no tape or glue at this stage. Pinning the pages allows you not only to line up the margins and pattern lines as you go, but also to make some small adjustments back (should they be needed). You can without any problem lift, shift and re-position the pages assembled in the beginning of the process. This may be needed when a pattern piece consists of many pages. Making such assembly adjustments when the pages are immediately glued/taped allover is not so easy.

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Take the next page of the second row and align its upper and left edges with the margins printed on adjacent pages. Pin, take another page, align…if only the first assembly row is done, the rest simply follows.

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You should see by now that it all comes nicely together and the pattern piece forms continuous lines through all the pages. This goes really quickly and works extremely well as the pages are (firmly enough) hold in place by the pins.

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sewing_patterns

Let’s get back to printing imperfections spotted along cut edges of our pages. This is really no problem at all to get out pattern piece right. Check under the paper edge with the missing line fraction and you will find that it matches the lines printed on the page underneath. Actually, what is not printed out on the edge of the top page is a part of the pattern piece printed on the page placed below it. Still, if you find this so disturbing that you simply must do something about it –  cut this un-printed bit off from the top page to see the lines printed on the page below it.

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sewing_patterns

Now it is finally the time to glue/tape the pages together. First on all, there is no need to join them all the way. We will tape/glue only the bits, which are only INSIDE the pattern piece. Methodically, join the raw edges of the pages and remove pins. The pages need to be glued/taped with each other only within the range of the pattern piece – this saves you not only the time, but also your sticky tape/glue –  isn’t it great? Why should you bother about the bits that are outside the pattern lines? They will be cut out and thrown away, so leave them hanging loose.

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sewing_patterns

Now simply cut the pattern piece out. You pattern piece is ready to go. TIP: never use your best fabric sheers to cut the paper as they will become blunt in no time. Read some notes on that in the article Cutting tools.

Here we go. Everything went not only well but also quickly and smoothly, without the trouble of trimming the margins. The assembly of pattern pieces in this way is just a piece of cake. Your pattern piece is ready for fabric cutting. You will find some “Dos and Don’ts” on this extremely important stage of a sewing project here:  Fabric cutting.

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